Improv Games for ConfidenceImprov Games for Confidence

It can be an elusive quality, confidence.  It often comes when we don’t need it, and vanishes without trace when we do.  Sports psychologists have made a career out of training people to be confident, but if you have too much it can be even worse.  Here are some improv games that can help with your confidence.

1. Point and Say

This is an exercise we often use early on in a session as it can be the first time that people have had to say or ‘come up with’ anything.  This in itself can be a huge step for people to take and this exercise gives them a nice easy way to achieve this, and also realise that there is delight in failure.

Method

  • Everyone moves around the room and tries not to fall into a group pattern
  • Each person in their own time points at something in the room and simply states what that thing is.
  • Eg. ‘Chair’, ‘Light’, ‘ someone’s face’, ‘switch’ etc.
  • Then each person points to something and simply names something that it is not.
  • Eg ‘Walrus’, ‘Happiness’, ‘Vodka’, ‘Stretchy pants’. (Obviously there may be a situation which you could point at these things but if so you may need help).
  • Finally ask people to point at something and say nothing.  Then point to something else and say what the previous thing they pointed at was.
  • Watch as people’s minds begin to melt.

Advanced Tips

  • Encourage people to point without thinking, then name things
  • You can use the rhythm of your walk to help you.  Eg, point every time you put your right foot forward.

Benefits

  • Creating ideas
  • Overcoming fear of speaking in public
  • Self-confidence

2. Stand and Deliver

Method

  • Stand in a circle
  • In turn, step forward and take in your ‘audience’ for a moment.
  • Then deliver a dull line of dialogue
  • Eg. ‘It’s nice weather today isn’t it?’
  • Everyone applauds enthusiastically.
  • You receive your applause and step back

Advanced Tips

  • Try it on a stage with a seated audience
  • Try to make eye contact with a few different people in your audience
  • Try to deliver your line as if it is very interesting
  • Take you time
  • Receive your applause with dignity and openness

Benefits

  • Being in the moment
  • Receiving praise
  • Self confidence

3. Three line scenes

This is a culmination of many of our improv workshops and is a great place to see the learning that has hopefully been embedded.

Method

  • Participants stand in a two lines facing each other. One line is designated as the starting line.
  • The first person from this line steps forward to the person opposite. These two people are now in a ‘3 line scene’.
  • The first person says a line of dialogue
  • The second responds
  • The first finishes the scene with one more line.

Advanced Tips

  • An experienced facilitator can include many variants, and give personal notes to people to achieve different outcomes.
  • It is helpful to encourage people not in that scene to pay attention and to show their appreciation afterwards.
  • Try to avoid questions
  • Try not to plan too much

Benefits

  • Co-creating a scene
  • Exuding confidence
  • Endowing other people with confidence.

Not sure you can land this one? Call The Maydays, and we can deliver these games either as part of a CPD accredited Business Improv Workshop, or as a free-standing energiser sequence at a conference or industry event.
We also create and deliver custom improvisation workshops for your business. Here are some of the most popular improv training formats in London, across the UK and internationally.
The Maydays are one of the longest established and renowned improvisation companies in the UK. We deliver comedy improv shows around the world, run regular improv classes in London and Brighton, and regularly deliver custom business improv solutions for organisations. Read how improv at work works here!

We would love to hear about your experiences trying these improv games.  To tell us about it, or to find out how we can bring Improv Training to your life and work, get in touch

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